EXTRACTION

EXTRACTION

A dental extraction (also referred to as exodontia) is the removal of a tooth from the mouth. Extractions are performed for a wide variety of reasons, including tooth decay that has destroyed enough tooth structure to render the tooth non-restorable.

WHY IS EXTRACTION OF MILK TEETH REQUIRED?

  1. Caries: Primary and secondary caries plus all sequelae including periapical abscess and failed pulpotomy.
  2. Orthodontic: Tooth removed to prevent or correct malocclusion.
  3. Trauma: Tooth extracted as a direct result of acute trauma.
  4. Loss: Tooth extracted because of its mobility; time for exfoliation.
  5. Periodontal disease: Loss of function, periodontal abscess and pain.
  6. General medical reasons: Prophylactic extraction.
  7. Economic reasons: The tooth could have been saved but the patient found treatment too expensive.
  8. Over-retention: Prolonged retention of primary teeth.
  9. Patient/parent request: The tooth could have been repaired, but the patient/parent insisted on extraction.

 

WHAT IS DONE DURING EXTRACTION?

  • First, the area surrounding the tooth is numbed to lessen any discomfort.
  • In most cases a small amount of bleeding is normal.
  • Have your child avoid anything that might prevent normal healing. This includes vigorous rinsing of the mouth vigorously or drinking through a straw (the sucking action may promote swelling and opening of the extraction site). These activities could also dislodge the clot and delay healing.

For the first few days, if rinsing is a necessity, rinse your child’s mouth gently. Afterward, for pain or swelling, apply a cold cloth or an ice bag. Ask our office about pain medication. Your child can brush and floss her other teeth as usual; but she mustn’t clean the teeth next to the tooth socket.